Friday, November 23, 2012

From the Rehearsal Room: Marnie Klar as "Joan"

As a special feature on opening weekend, we're excited to introduce you to our cast members and their experiences creating the world of LOVE SONG. 

LOVE SONG opens November 23 and runs through December 9 - Wed-Sat at 8pm and Sat-Sun at 2pm. For tickets and information, click here

Introducing: Marnie Klar, who's playing Joan in LOVE SONG. Here is her first-hand account of the rehearsal process. 

LOVE SONG is the first production I’ve been fortunate enough to work on with the great people of The Seeing Place Theater. After seeing numerous examples of Erin and Brandon’s work in other productions, I’m thrilled to now have a “behind the scenes,” if you will, or insight into the way they operate.

I’ve been acting for a while now and have learned several different acting techniques over the years. Usually, when learning a new process, I’m able to take all the variations I’ve learned previously and apply them into one solid form through the rehearsal process, which I’m therefore able to bring to the stage. Working with Brandon and Erin is also just that, however, they’ve added their own methodology to great success. Their process is so unique and yet it all makes sense.

After going through some table work/dramaturgy and improvisation exercises, I remember our first rehearsal we were on our feet for the first time, script in hand for two scenes. While it doesn’t sound too far out of the norm (incorporating the lines of the script, your intention and physical activities) that day we learned something called “speaking out.” This was a process very foreign to me, as it incorporates not just the subtext of the characters, but actually all the “actor thoughts” that are ever present in our work as well. I learned that while that seems easy enough, I’m not actually used to articulating every thought on my mind. I seemed to just relish in the word, “ok" but not everything that “ok,” really encapsulated. Such as, “ok...I feel incredibly awkward,” or “ok...this is what I'm talking about,” and so on. I learned that we're allowed to feel the things we're feeling and think the things we're thinking - now how do I actually incorporate those realities into my work?

One example that stuck with me occurred early on when talking through beat changes. If there's a scene where my character spans multiple thoughts & emotions, how do I take that journey? Speaking out allowed me to talk through my private thoughts as the beats progresses. These were things I had in my mind but has never articulated. With speaking out, I now understand completely why or how I would go from one though to another. And articulating it? That’s something I’m working on…

***

Marnie Klar is originally from Virginia Beach with a BFA in Musical Theatre from the University of Miami. While at Miami, Marnie performed in such productions as Into The Woods (Cinderella), The World Goes 'Round, Tartuffe (Elmire), Piece of My Heart (Mary Jo) and Mame, directed by the legendary Jerry Herman. Favorite regional credits include Three Tall Women (B), Wild Oats (Jane), A Lie of the Mind (Lorraine), all at the Ensemble Theatre of Cincinnati. Favorite NY credits include Shakespeare's Venus and Adonis (Venus- HERE Arts Center), Warning Adult Content (Elizabeth- Shetler Studios, TDG), Jewel Thieves! (Lady Lynne Fortescue- Time Square Arts Center), and Fleet Week: The Musical (Lucille Lortel Theatre- Fringe NYC '05 Winner Outstanding Musical). In 2011, Marnie presented her first all rock cabaret, "Marnie Klar Sings...," and was featured as part of the "People You Should Know" Cabaret Series at Don't Tell Mama.  Member AEA  Web: www.marnieklar.com

14 comments:

  1. I saw the show tonight and this result of this process in action. Congratulations. Your interpretation of the role of Joan was funny and convincing at the same time.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's great! Thank you so much, Alan!

      Delete
  2. I don't know that it's our own methodology. I'll give Lee Strasberg the credit there. But as far as I know, we're the only company that uses Speaking Out as a rehearsal technique. It's exciting to see how much it's done for you!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Brandon! It's an interesting rehearsal technique. I'm glad to learn it. And I love working this way with y'all.

      Delete
  3. All I can say is, thank god I had someone else to go through it all with. ha!

    ReplyDelete
  4. I had an acting teacher who would always say "Your problem is more than likely the character's problem!" I'd venture to say that Joan-the-character also has trouble articulating her thoughts, so maybe your perception that you have a problem articulating your thoughts is just you deeply identified with her as a character. Bam!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nice Magan! I hear ya.

      What's tough, though, is when you go home and question yourself... How to separate. The cool/learning part is applying what YOU just described and actually believing that it's true. That you're on the right path... And, incorporating the insecurities (actor related or not) truthfully in performance. It's all a learning process... which I adore!

      Delete
  5. I can't wait to finally see the show this Wednesday! I'll post back after!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. After seeing the show, I can definitely see how the use of speaking out in rehearsals translates to open and honest work on stage. The thing I admired most about your performance was its natural flow. It moved from one moment to the next - the journey you talked about - using the text and the action of the play, but complete with your own thoughts and point of view. I can't wait to see it again and see how it has grown!

      Delete
  6. I love your honesty,,,,,on and off stage and in this article. I thought your energy was amazing. I look forward to seeing it again next week, as I am sure it will have grown greatly and interestingly!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sue-Ellen- you're wonderful. Thank you so much! You're an amazing person and played a charming Lybov last night in our reading of "The Cherry Orchard." I'm so looking forward to seeing you on the stage.

      Delete
  7. Great post Marnie! I am so excited to apply the Process we use at the seeing place to discover beat changes in scenes as well. I have found that a combination of planning for and improvising these changes works best for me. So when I get a new scene, I will sift through it and plot out some changes with the text, but when I play with it aloud, I try to leave any planning at the door. Things always change and it grows deeper, but having a common method with which I can improv with my fellow actors is something I really look forward to.

    ReplyDelete

We're so passionate about creating a conversation in our community - thank you for leaving your thoughts!